When eggplant season is in full swing, I count on BABAGANOUSH to get me through the season. A few extra eggplant from Friday's harvest gave me a chance to kick off babaganoush season and share my technique with all of you.IMG_8028

I like my babaganoush super creamy and a little sweet (and everyone I've shared it with seems to be in agreement), so this recipe is all about achieving these goals.

JULIA'S BABAGANOUSH

Roast eggplant, onions, and garlic, drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled with salt in the oven at about 375°

  • You can use any variety of eggplant, sliced lengthwise with the sliced side down
  • Onions should be peeled and cut in half, with the cut side down
  • Garlic should be left as whole bulbs and drizzled generously with olive oil
  • A bit of water in the pan (maybe 1/2 to 3/4 cup for a standard pan) will help soften the eggplant with steam but will get you less crispy bits -- it's a trade-off

Roast until the eggplant is really cooked through. The pieces should be seriously mushy under the skin.

  • Sometimes garlic and onions are ready to be taken out earlier, which is fine
  • Garlic cloves should be browned and soft enough to squeeze out of their skin, onions should be slightly browned and tender

IMG_1959Scoop eggplant (once it has cooled a bit) out of the skin and into a food processor with onions and garlic cloves and get the processor running

  • Run the food processor for a little longer than you think you need. Getting a creamy texture is key.

Add a spoonful of tahini (if you have it around), some lemon juice and salt to taste, and olive oil if the mixture is slow to smooth out

IMG_1960Scoop out your babaganoush and enjoy!

  • We went through it pretty quickly around here

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